Ancestor Report
generation I

1 (0)
man Alaric Hubert St. George Gore Langton of Hatch Beauchamp, Somerset, UK‏‎ #51315
Born ‎14 Nov 1918 Hatch Beauchamp, Somerset, UK, died ‎13 Mar 1987 Hatch Beauchamp, Somerset, UK‎, 68 years, buried ‎ Hatch Beauchamp, Somerset, UK. Occupation: Landowner
generation II (Parents)

2 (1)
man Hubert Edwin Gore Langton‏‎ #51325
Born ‎18 Aug 1883 Hatch Beauchamp, Somerset, UK, died ‎6 Mar 1968 Hatch Beauchamp, Somerset, UK‎, 84 years, buried ‎ Hatch Beauchamp, Somerset, UK. Occupations: Landowner, ‎1940; Boy Scout Association/County Commissioner (Somerset)
 Married ‎2 Sep 1909 Paddington, London, England Lady Alice was a first cousin to Hubert (51 years married) to:
3 (1)
woman Alice Mary "Alice M T Gore Langton" Temple-Gore Langton of Taunton, Somerset, UK , Lady‏‎ #51374
Born ‎15 Jan 1876 Newton St. Loe, Somerset, UK, died ‎2 Jan 1961 Taunton, Somerset, UK‎, 84 years, buried ‎ Hatch Beauchamp, Somerset, UK
generation III (Grandparents)

4 (2)
man Henry Powell Gore Langton of Hatch Beauchamp, Somerset, UK , Hon.‏‎ #51324 The Honourable HENRY POWELL GORE
LANGTON, Lt.-Col. late commanding 3rd Batt. Somerset
Light Infantry, J.P, co. Somerset. Born Dec. 14, 1854,
being the second son of the late William Henry Powell
Gore-Langton and Lady Anna Eliza, dau. of the Duke of
Buckingham and Chandos. Livery - Dark blue and silver
buttons. Armorial bearisfrs (R.L. 1783, H. Coll.)-
Quarterly i and 4, quarterly sable and or, a bend argent
(for Langton) ; a and 3, gules, a fesse between three
crosses crosslet fitch^ or (for Gore). Mantling sable and
or. Crests - I. on a wreath of the colours, an eagle or, and
wyvern vert, their necks entwined regardant (for Langton) ;
2. on a wreath of the colours, on a mount %ert, an heraldic
tiger salient argent, collared gules (for Gore). Motto -
" In hoc signo vinces." Married, Sept. 5, 1878, Marguerite
Lticy, dau. of the late Major Robert Guthrie MacGregor ;
and has Issue - (i) John Henry Cyril Gore Langton, Gentle-
man, b. June 19, 1879, d. Aug. 31, 1879; (2) William Alec
Grenville Gore Langton, Esq., b. Nov. 3, iSSi, d. May
27, 1893; (3) Hubert Edwin Gore Langton, Esq., Lieut.
R.N., b. Aug. 18, 1883; (4) Robert Lancelot Gore Lang-
ton, Gentleman, b. March 30, 1885; (5) Norman Eric Gore
Langton, Gentleman, b. July 22, 1886 ; (6) Richard Gerald
Gore Langton, Gentleman, Cadet R.N., b. March 16, 1892.
5*a/- Hatch Park, Taunton. Club - Junior Carlton.

Arthur Charles Fox-Davies. Armorial families : a directory of gentlemen of coat-armour. (page 136 of 354) (from internet)
Born ‎14 Dec 1854, died ‎1913 Hatch Beauchamp, Somerset, UK Original will dated 7th February 1893; Codicil added 11th February 1913.‎, 58 or 59 years, buried ‎ Hatch Beauchamp, Somerset, UK. Occupation: Landowner
 Married ‎5 Sep 1878 Shimla, India Detail from Marriage Settlement (34 or 35 years married) to:
5 (2)
woman Marguerite Lucy "Margaret L Gore Langton" MacGregor of Taunton, Somerset, UK‏‎ #51358
Born ‎1858 Duppie, France, died ‎8 Oct 1915 Hatch Beauchamp, Somerset, UK‎, 56 or 57 years, buried ‎ Hatch Beauchamp, Somerset, UK
6 (3)
man Earl William Stephen "William Stephen Temple-Gore Langton" Temple-Gore Langton 4th Earl Temple of Stowe , 4th Earl Temple of Stowe‏‎ #8720 March 12 1892 Royal permission granted to add TEMPLE to GORE-LANGTON
Born ‎11 May 1847, died ‎20 Mar 1902‎, 54 years, buried ‎ Newton St. Loe, Somerset, UK Grave no 271. Occupation: Landowner
4th Earl Temple of Stowe

succeeded as Earl Temple of Stowe, 6 March 1889

Grant of Langton/Gore arms: 5 Apr 1892. Source: College of arms.
 Married ‎29 Dec 1870 (31 years married) to:
7 (3)
woman Helen Mabel Graham-Montgomery‏‎ #8696
Born ‎± 1849, died ‎21 Nov 1918‎, approximately 69 years, buried ‎ Newton St. Loe, Somerset, UK Grave no 272
generation IV (Great-Grandparents)

8 (4)
man William Henry Powell Gore Langton of Combe Hay, Somerset, UK‏‎ #51336
Born ‎25 Jul 1824 Combe Hay, Somerset, UK, died ‎11 Dec 1873‎, 49 years, buried ‎18 Dec 1873 Newton St. Loe, Somerset, UK Grave no 132. Occupation: Landowner
Lots more on him and his descendants here:
http://thepeerage.com/p1252.htm12516
and information on him here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Temple-Gore-Langton,_4th_Earl_Temple_of_Stowe

Lord of Newton Park, and Hatch Beuachamp, Somersetshire.
 Married ‎9 Jun 1846 London, England (27 years married) to:
9 (4)
12 (6)
 Married ‎9 Jun 1846 London, England (27 years married) to:
13 (6)
generation V (Great Great-Grandparents)

16 (8)
man Colonel William "William Gore Langton" Gore Langton of Combe Hay, Somerset, England M.P‏‎ #51334
Born ‎27 Sep 1787 Newton St. Loe, Somerset, UK, died ‎8 Dec 1828 Penzance, Cornwall, UK‎, 41 years, buried ‎16 Dec 1828 Newton St. Loe, Somerset, UK
of Combe Hay
 Married ‎21 Feb 1822 London, England (5 years married) to:
17 (8)
woman Jescinthia Frances Dorothea "Jacintha Frances Dorothea Collins" Collins‏‎ #51305 Marriage register at St George's Hanover Square records her as JESCINTHIA Frances Dorothea.
Baptism Record at Combe Hay for her two children record her as JESCINTHIA.
Burial register at Newton St Loe records her as JESCINTHIA Frances Dorothea.
Burke's Peerage records her as Jacintha, and she appears to have been known by that name at Hatch Beauchamp.
Born ‎1801 Hardenhuish, Wiltshire, UK Newton St. Loe Parish records give her age as 26 at her death. (And the parents married June 1800.), died ‎26 Feb 1827 Somerset, UK‎, 25 or 26 years, buried ‎7 Mar 1827 Newton St. Loe, Somerset, UK Buried in Langton Tomb (Sexton's records in Somerset Records Office)
18 (9)
man Duke Richard Platagenet-Temple-Nugent-Brydges-Chandos-Grenville of Buckingham and Chandos‏‎ #25735

Duke of Buckingham and Chandos, Marquees of Buckingham, Marquees of Chandos, also Earl Nugent in the Peerage of Ireland
 Married ‎13 May 1819 London, England
Divorced ‎19 Jan 1840 (20 years married) from:
19 (9)
N.N.‎
generation VI (3rd Great-Grandparents)

32 (16)
man Collonel William "William Gore Langton, William Gore Langton" Gore of Barrow Court, Somerset, UK of Newton St Loe, Somerset, UK‏‎ #51338 Took the name and Arms of LANGTON by Royal License dated 5 August 1783
Died ‎14 Mar 1847 London, England, buried ‎26 Mar 1847 Newton St. Loe, Somerset, UK
it was a condition in Bridget's fathers will that the name Langton continue, hence to claim the inheritance, William Gore changed his name to Gore-Langton. He took the Langton arms on the 5 Aug 1783 by royal licence, Sable and Or a bend Argent.

Bridget, his first wife, died in childbirth.

He served as Colonel for at least 32 years and the Oxford Militia were called up to defend Britian in the event of the French crossing the channel which was a very real fear.

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~dutillieul/ZOtherPapers/S&WJJul61818.html
and
http://www.historyofparliamentonline.org/volume/1790-1820/member/gore-langton-william-1760-1847
 Married ‎1783 (9 or 10 years married) to:
33 (16)
woman Bridget "Bridget Langton" Langton of Newton Park, Somerset‏‎ #51351
Born ‎± 1762, died ‎24 Nov 1793 Oxfordshire‎, approximately 31 years, death cause: died in childbirth, buried ‎14 Dec 1793 Newton St. Loe, Somerset, UK
died in childbirth.
34 (17)
 Married/ Related to:
35 (17)
generation VII (4th Great-Grandparents)

64 (32)
 Married ‎± 1760 (approximately 41 years married) to:
65 (32)
woman Barbara Browne‏‎ #8690
Born ‎1729, died ‎1801‎, 71 or 72 years
66 (33)
man Sheriff Joseph "Joseph Langton" Langton of Newton St Lowe, Somersetshire‏‎ #857
Born ‎1707, died ‎10 Feb 1779‎, 71 or 72 years, buried ‎17 Feb 1779 Newton St. Loe, Somerset, UK
LANGTON ESTATES DD\GL/118 1693-c.1732
12 docts.
Contents:
Estimate of value of real estate of Joseph Langton, esq.,n.d., c.1732 and subsidiary documents comprising: list of rents received from Jos. Langton at Pilton, court, 1732; lists of Stanton Prior and Twerton chief rents, n.d., c.1732; lists of tenants and valuations of estates at Hallatrow in High Littleton, Newton St. Loe, Fellow and Cold Ashton, (co. Glos.) n.d., c. 1732; survey of Hallatrow Farm, giving field names, annual value, acreage, and particulars of other tenements, 1730; abstracts of deeds re. Newton St. Loe, Stanton Prior, Wellow (incl. Twinhoe) and Brislington, 1708-18; abstract of will of Robt. Langton, esq., 1708; draft survey of manor of Pilton, n.d., c. 1700, and 'new survey of manor of Norton Malreward' giving names of tenants, nos. of lives, rents, yearly value, and purchase values, but no details of property, 1693.

Sheriff of Somersetshire, 1734 - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_High_Sheriffs_of_Somerset

He tried to become M.P for Bath 4 times, but never got elected.

19 May 1761 - probably the Joseph mentioned here (Somerset) in the land tax of George III. Could he also be the one listed for Gloucesteshire?:
http://books.google.co.uk/books?ei=NTx4T6zBJ6Wf0QWC8JGnDQ&id=V80rAQAAMAAJ&dq=%22long+Ledenham%22+langton&ots=03n6zZhLYg&q=langton=snippet&q=langton&f=false

Mentions his good friend Paul METHUEN Esq. of Corsham in his will, which is why their is a miniature portrait of him at Corsham Court today.

Also mentions CLUTTERBUCK in his will.

His will here:
http://www.highlittletonhistory.org.uk/transcriptions0905/HLWills&Indx.pdf

As well as owning Newton St. Lowe, he purchased the Corston estates in 1770 from Rev. John Harrington.

[no title] 6609/8/h 21st June, 1794
Contents:
Probate of will of Joseph Langton of Bristol, merchant

Heraldry: The arms are those of Langton impaling Evelyn, for Joseph Langton of Newton Park, Somerset, who married Bridget Glanville Evelyn (b. 1733):
http://www.ashmolean.org/ash/objects/makedetail.php?pmu=129&mu=148>y=brow&sec=&dtn=20&sfn=Heraldry&cpa=29&rpos=573

Cold Ashton:
http://www.owlpen.com/img/cotswold_houses/jacobean.pdf

This source incorrectly states that his name was Joshua:
http://www.archive.org/stream/s10notesqueries06londuoft/s10notesqueries06londuoft_djvu.txt
 Married ‎1769 (4 or 5 years married) to:
67 (33)
generation VIII (5th Great-Grandparents)

128 (64)
 Married/ Related to:
129 (64)
130 (65)
 Married ‎May 1725 to:
131 (65)
132 (66)
man Robert Langton of Brislington‏‎ #556
Died ‎1708, buried ‎13 Jun 1708 Newton St. Loe, Somerset, UK
Youngest. Only Brother to Thomas.
In 1704 Robert sold the manor of Thornhill, South of Malmesbury (or a little to the East, South Swindon was called the hundred of Thornhill), along with lands in Kington and Yatton to Walter White Esq. of Grittleton - the price paid - £3325
 Married ‎16 Apr 1702 Newton St. Loe, Somerset, UK (5 or 6 years married) to:
133 (66)
woman Anne Langton of Newton Park, Somerset‏‎ #554
Born ‎1678, died ‎Sep 1748 Newton St. Loe, Somerset, UK‎, 69 or 70 years
134 (67)
 Married/ Related to:
135 (67)
N.N.‎
generation IX (6th Great-Grandparents)

256 (128)
man Sir Thomas Gore‏‎ #8725
Died ‎1675
 Married/ Related to:
257 (128)
258 (129)
 Married/ Related to:
259 (129)
N.N.‎
264 (132)
man Sir (Knt.) Mayor and Sheriff Thomas Langton of Bristol‏‎ #544
Born ‎1632, died ‎Jun 1673‎, 40 or 41 years, buried ‎1673 Bristol, Gloucestershire, UK Bristol past and present:
http://www23.us.archive.org/stream/bristolpastandp00taylgoogage/n74/mode/2up/search/langton

1648, apprentices to William Cann, Merchant, Mayor, and later married his daughter Hester Cann. Source: Bristol Past and Present:
http://www23.us.archive.org/stream/bristolpastandp00taylgoogpage/n324/mode/2up/search/langton

[no title] 6609/8/c 8th March, 1665
Lease on lives
(1) Thomas Langton of Bristol, Esq., (2) Joseph Langton and Ezechiel Langton of Bristol (3) Elizabeth Gonninge, widow and Robert Gonninge (4) Francis Vaughan of Wrington, Som., and Giles Earle of Bristol.
Farm called Thornehill, Wilts; property in Siston and Pucklechurch and house in Small Street, Bristol.

Alderman of Bristol in 1664 (from September 16). Mayor of Bristol in September 1666 and was knighted by Charles in London on 4 Nov 1666 at Whitehall. He was an Alderman until 1675 due to his death.
http://ia600401.us.archive.org/27/items/bristollistsmuni00beav/bristollistsmuni00beav.pdf

left a gift of a sermon to be preached to the poor and £50 for bread:
http://www23.us.archive.org/stream/bristolpastandp00taylgoogage/n180/mode/2up/search/langton
 Married ‎± 1660 (approximately 13 years married) to:
265 (132)
woman Dame Elizabeth "Elizabeth Goninge, Elizabeth Gonning" Gunning of Cold Ashton‏‎ #1347
Born ‎± 1637, died ‎between 24 Apr 1703 and 10 Dec 1703 Cold Ashton, Gloucestershire, UK‎, 65 or 66 years, buried ‎10 Dec 1703 Bristol, Gloucestershire, UK from FamilySearch index
will 1702:
http://www.portbury-hundred.co.uk/bristolwills.htm

Cold Ashton was held by the Gunnings and past to her:
http://archive.org/stream/annalsofparishof00peacage/24/mode/2up/search/langton

Other sisters relatives inherited other Gunning properites and seem to have continued good relationships with the Langtons:
Reference:C 3/262/3
Description:
Short title: Clifforde v Strowde.
Plaintiffs: James Clifforde.
Defendants: Thomas Strowde and another [Langton].
Subject: manor of Knoll , Somerset.
Document type: bill, answer, replication.
Date: 1604

This link is perhaps significant as Captain James Langton, who married Margery Hobbes, is known from other sources to have held the Manor at Knoll. James was a member of the Yorkshire Langton group that appear in Bristol. Therefore, this is the strongest evidence we have to date (09/10/2012) that the Bristol civic Langtons were also members of the same family from Yorkshire.
266 (133)
man M.P Joseph "Joseph Laughton, Joseph Lancton" Langton of Newton Park and Bath‏‎ #550
Born ‎1641, died ‎17 Mar 1720 http://idox.bathnes.gov.uk/WAM/doc/BackGround%20Papers-431754.pdf?extension=.pdf&id=431754&location=VOLUME2&contentType=application/pdf&pageCount=1‎, 78 or 79 years, buried ‎21 Mar 1720 Newton St. Loe, Somerset, UK
Langton, Joseph (Lancton) arm. MagdalenColl., matric. 15 June, 1657; of Newton Park, Somerset, bar.-at-law, Inner Temple, 1668, as Laughton, of Bristol (see also Ezekiel), M.P. Bath(Oct.), 1690-5; died 17 March, 1719-20, aged 82. See Foster's Judges and Barristers.
Alumni Oxonienses 1500-1714
http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=119367

youngest of 5 Sons. At least three sisters.

Inherited from elder brothers in 56, and 61

Joseph bought the Manor and estate of Newton Park (Newton, St. Loe, Somerset. ) in 1666. Buying it from George Nevill’s widow.
Joseph Langton built the enclosed park, with the help of Capability Brown.

His descendant Bridget Langton to William Gore of Barrow Court created the name Gore-Langton, which continued there until the death of the last remaining Earl Temple in 1941, when the Duchy of Cornwall took over the estate.

He left Middle Anger and Ercott, Glos. to his daughter then grandaughter Frances.:
http://www.highlittletonhistory.org.uk/transcriptions0905/HLWills&Indx.pdf

Sheriff of Somersetshire, 1697:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_High_Sheriffs_of_Somerset

Was M.P. for Bath, October 1690-1695 (contested at general election, failed, but then was unanimously voted in at the by-election in October).

Ill in 1664-5 was granted leave of absence.

Magdalen Coll. Oxf. 1657: I. Temple, 1660, called 1668.

Probably that mentioned here http://www.blacksheepindex.co.uk/WILLLa-Lyt.pdf - 1694 and 1717 (the second probably a will)

At least one of his sons has children, because he mentioned his grandaughters in his will, Elizabeth Langton, and Frances Langton.

Mentions a cousin Mary ALLANSON in his will and Cousin BAUGH and Cousin Thomas LEWIS and Cousin GRANT, Widow.

Mentions God-daughter, the Widow PARSONS. Godsons, John CHAMPNEYS and Joseph STRACHY

Mentions Kinsman Mr Henry SHUTE in his will.

His will of 1718 here:
http://www.highlittletonhistory.org.uk/transcriptions0905/HLWills&Indx.pdf

Stanton Prior:
http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/A2A/records.aspx?cat=168-ddsas_1&cid=-1&Gsm=2008-06-18-1

He mentioned a cousin Elizabeth Vickers in his will. not sure how she fits in.

http://www.historyofparliamentonline.org/volume/1690-1715/member/langton-joseph-1637-1719
 Married ‎8 Feb 1667€15 Feb 1667 Little Pekham, Kent, UK http://www.archive.org/stream/calendarmarriag00offigoogage/n61/mode/1up/search/langton (48 or 49 years married) to:
267 (133)
woman Frances Borlase of Buckinghamshire‏‎ #551
Died ‎1716, buried ‎27 Aug 1716 Newton St. Loe, Somerset, UK
heir of her brother Sir John
generation X (7th Great-Grandparents)

512 (256)
man William Gore‏‎ #8727
Died ‎1662
 Married/ Related to:
513 (256)
528 (264)
man Sheriff John Langton of Bristol and Easton Piercy, Wilts‏‎ #542
Born ‎± 1600, died ‎Apr 1645/6 http://ia600401.us.archive.org/27/items/bristollistsmuni00beav/bristollistsmuni00beav.pdf‎, approximately 45 years
thornhill passed to him by his father in 1625.
While the Langtons had it
The Manor House is vcr)' large and well built, in the old Wiltshire
style so common in this neighbourhood, with bold gables, orna-
mented freestone chimneys, and casement windows. In 1630,
soon after it had passed from the Snells to the Langtons, all the
older house then standing was taken down and rebuilt, except the
Hall and some smaller portions. The parts rebuilt by the Langtons
are distinguished by dates and initials. On one chimney " I L.
A L. 1G30." (John and Alice Langton) : on another "T L. 1664."
(Thomas Langton) : and on the west front " I L. 1631." (John
Langton). The older part which they did not take down, is still
left, and forms a north wing. Its principal window, described
by Aubrey as of " peculiar old fashion, " is of six lights, divided
by stone mullions and crossed by one transom. Above it is another,
once of like size, but now partly blocked up. The two stand out
in bold projection under a sloping tiled roof. The other windows in
tliis more ancient portion, being of ecclesiastical style with cinquefoil

John Langton was Warden of the Bristol Merchant Venturers Company in 1630/1, Treasurer in 1639, and Warden in 1641.
http://ia600401.us.archive.org/27/items/bristollistsmuni00beav/bristollistsmuni00beav.pdf

Sheriff of Bristol in 1634, Alderman from 1638 until death.

John Langton junior paid £10 ship money during the reign of Charles I.

During the Civil War when Bristol was captured by Prince Rupert of the Rhine, John Langton was amongst those who paid £200 to prevent the troops from plundering the city but taxes were levied. In compensation Charles I in 1643 granted the Bristol Merchant Venture Company the right to trade with Russia, Turkey, Denmark and the Hansa towns.

St edmund Hall
This John (i think) who benefited from the Newfoundland Plantation project, under the Bristol Merchant Venturers Company, as well as some others including William Meredith.

also owned an estate/land at Brokenborough, Wiltshire, 1612
 Married ‎27 Jan 1625 (at most 38 years married) to:
529 (264)
woman Joane "Joan Butcher, Joan Burrus" Burrows of Bristol‏‎ #543
Died ‎before 30 Sep 1663
In Glos. Records office:
DocumentRef D189/II/2/T1
Title Tripartite division of estate of late Mrs. Johane Langton of Bristol, widow, between her sons Thomas, Joseph and Ezekiel referring to messuages and lands in Kings Weston, Laurence Weston, Henbury and Westbury, Broad Street and the Shambles, Bristol, Pucklechurch, Morton and Thornbury; detailed descriptions and value of the personal property divided, 1660-61; includes copy will of Johane Langton, 1659
Date [1659]-1663

1653:
http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=LZLNAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA151&lpg=PA151&dq=%22langton%22+%22bristoll%22&source=bl&ots=OzrjO1PAGp&sig=O01GkzdZRiKmlSuhBO1VsDcgfS0&hl=en&sa=X&ei=HgFdUJrgB-jU0QXAtID4BA&ved=0CD0Q6AEwCA4-1-188

gifts of Mary and her mother to Bristol churches for the poor. Some of the dates given seem to conflict with the periods in which they were known to live.:
http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=n4sUAAAAQAAJ&pg=PA71&lpg=PA71&dq=will+%22mary+langton%22+bristol+-lostlangtons&source=bl&ots=FKyobD2y3h&sig=Ik-7GB0c0RkmpkQFi_sQd46OrsQ&hl=en&sa=X&ei=CEVbUK2xCuXF0QXfoIAY&redir_esc=y=onepage&q=langton&f=false

This source claims she was the daughter of William Burrowes, but we don't think that is correct:
http://idox.bathnes.gov.uk/WAM/doc/BackGround%20Papers-431754.pdf?extension=.pdf&id=431754&location=VOLUME2&contentType=application/pdf&pageCount=1
530 (265)
man Sheriff and Mayor John Gunning of Bristol‏‎ #1348
Died ‎1645
Sheriff 1635, Mayor 1645; bought Manors of Cold Ashton, Torney's Court, and Tatwick

http://archive.org/stream/annalsofparishof00peacage/24/mode/2up/search/langton
 Married/ Related to:
531 (265)
532 (266)
man Sheriff John Langton of Bristol and Easton Piercy, Wilts‏‎ #542 (Allready listed above as number 528)
 Married ‎27 Jan 1625 (at most 38 years married) to:
533 (266)
woman Joane "Joan Butcher, Joan Burrus" Burrows of Bristol‏‎ #543 (Allready listed above as number 529)
534 (267)
 Married/ Related to:
535 (267)
generation XI (8th Great-Grandparents)

1024 (512)
man Mayor (Sir) John Gore of London‏‎ #8729
Died ‎1636
He held the office of Lord Mayor of London in 1624
 Married/ Related to:
1025 (512)
1056 (528)
man Mayor and Sheriff John Langton of Bristol‏‎ #540
Born ‎1571, died ‎1636/7‎, approximately 65 years
1611, CHARTER OF THE LONDON AND BRISTOL COMPANY. EARL OF NORTHHAMPTON AND ASSOCIATES.
http://www.heritage.nf.ca/law/lab4/labvol4_1701.html
mentions John Langton, who is probably this John Langton.

we think it is this John who was Sheriff of Bristol in 1614.

A picture of his drawing room door (1614) shows the Lincolnshire shield quartered with two others, though this is not conclusive proof as families of this time adopted other Langton families shields for various reasons, among which was to hide their true identity.

John Langton was Warden of the Bristol Merchant Venturers Company in 1613, Treasurer in 1615 and Master in 1620.
http://ia600401.us.archive.org/27/items/bristollistsmuni00beav/bristollistsmuni00beav.pdf

1617, involved in the trade of currants:
http://www.bristol.ac.uk/Depts/History/Maritime/Sources/2009sfpgent.pdf

Merchant Venture company of bristol
In 1618 John Langton was a member of the Company with John Doughtie, William Pitt (mayor and master), Edward Coxe, Humphrey Hooker, George White and Thomas Davies.

He bought the following in 1618 according to Charles Langtons book the Langtons of Langton:
owned Easton Piercy in kingston st michael chippenham.
owned lands in Brokenborough (2 miles north of Malmesbury), Thornhill Manor and lands south of Malmesbury. All this was apparently settled, as a wedding gift, on his son John.

Probably this John, though it could be his father:
The Book of Trade lists fourteen Merchant Society merchants that were sent to the Star Chamber in 1619 on account of, ‘transporting p[ro]hibited goods out of Wales’,

and further references here in 1614 and 1619:
http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/A2A/records.aspx?cat=040-d2697&cid=2-3v=onepage&q=langton&f=false

newfoundland charter:
https://archive.org/stream/genesisofuniteds01browage/n517/mode/2up
 Married/ Related to:
1057 (528)
woman Alice Unknown of Bristol‏‎ #541
Buried ‎4 Apr 1659 Marshfield, Gloucestershire, UK
we don't know that it was the Mrs Langton buried at Marshfield, but if not her, then we would have to invent a new Mrs Langton in this period.
http://www26.us.archive.org/stream/parishregisterso00marsage/132/mode/2up
1058 (529)
man Alderman John "Mary Boucher" Butcher of Bristol‏‎ #1464
Died ‎± 1622
think it is this John Butcher with his will here:
http://www.highlittletonhistory.org.uk/transcriptions0905/HLWills&Indx.pdf

mentions John Thrupp, a name that comes up in Margery Hobbes (alias, Langton)'s will on 1622.
 Married/ Related to:
1059 (529)
1060 (530)
man Mayor John Gunning of Bristol‏‎ #49501
Died ‎after 1627
Mayor in 1627
 Married/ Related to:
1061 (530)
N.N.‎
1062 (531)
 Married/ Related to:
1063 (531)
generation XII (9th Great-Grandparents)

2048 (1024)
man Alderman Gerard Gore of London‏‎ #8731
Died ‎11 Dec 1607
held the office of Alderman of London
 Married/ Related to:
2049 (1024)
2112 (1056)
man Clerk John "John Langton" Langton of Horfield, Bristol and Uley, Glos of Uley, Gloucestershire‏‎ #539
Born ‎± 1535 Uley, Gloucestershire, UK, died ‎after 1598‎
He may well be the one born in Uley, Glos. who then had a issue, the ancester of the Langtons of Bristol.

29 Sep 1565: John s of Thomas Dymock Horfield Glos to john Langton and Mary wf for 7 years App to have at end 20/-
http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=VIJnAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA126&lpg=PA126&dq=%22Richard+langton%22+notary+public&source=bl&ots=xUBSFf-m08&sig=locBP_T9V9NZJC_KEL_4ppba_HE&hl=en&sa=X&ei=qUU5T5-9EsSq0QWakNmLAg&ved=0CHkQ6AEwCA=onepage&q=langton&f=false

Burgess information for pre-1600 Langtons in Bristol:
14.01.1572 - John Langton, Gentleman - patron council.
Source - Bristol Burgess Books - Vols 1-21, 1557-1995, Bristol & Avon Family HIstory Society CD.Background information here:   Click here: Bristol Burgesses

1598, mentioned here with Anselme Langton. We assume it is this John, though it could be another of the Johns:
http://www.bris.ac.uk/Depts/History/Maritime/Sources/2006dunn.pdf
 
 Married ‎± 1550 this is based on the fact that we have a source showing John Langton married to wife Mary in 1552. So, if this is the same John Langton (and it may not be) then the marriage occurred before 1552. Guessing at about 1550. to:
2113 (1056)
woman Mary "Mary Unknown" Basset of Uley, Gloucestershire‏‎ #3873
Born ‎between 1510 and 1540 Uley, Gloucestershire, UK
http://www.archive.org/stream/ancestryofedward00sumnage/30/mode/2up

Her nephew died with children in 1601. This suggests that she was born about 1525.

Ancestors of the Bassetts were called Anselme too, which is prob. where the name came into the Langtons from.
2114 (1057)
 Married/ Related to:
2115 (1057)
generation XIII (10th Great-Grandparents)

4224 (2112)
man Richard "Unknown Langton" Langton the younger of Kirkby Warfe, Yorkshire, UK‏‎ #3225
Born ‎± 1494 birth date is very close.we know he was 12 at his father's death.
He was mentioned in the will of William Nelson in 1478, whose daughter he married:
http://genforum.genealogy.com/nelson/messages/10932.html

also the marriage is mentioned here:
http://www.ebooksread.com/authors-eng/england-guild-of-corpus-christi-york/the-register-of-the-guild-of-corpus-christi-in-the-city-of-york-hci/page-21-the-register-of-the-guild-of-corpus-christi-in-the-city-of-york-hci.shtml

he was 12 and more at the death of his father. His father's will was 1506:
http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/catalogue/displaycataloguedetails.asp?CATID=-5733388&CATLN=7&accessmethod=5&j=1

13 May 1505 and 29 september 1506.
http://archive.org/stream/calendarofinquis03greatage/159/mode/1up

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

we think the bristol root springs from Richard the younger of kirkby wharfe, yorks.
Richard Langton of Bristol is noted as having come from there. He lives into the 1590s so he cant be the same one. We therefore think he is the son, along with Francis of Bristol, who is associated with him.
Richard, the younger, up in Yorkshire is known to have had a son Francis before 1523, so we think Francis and Richard are both sons of Richard the younger of Yorkshire and brothers to each other.
 Married/ Related to:
4225 (2112)
4226 (2113)
 Married ‎1534 to:
4227 (2113)
generation XIV (11th Great-Grandparents)

8448 (4224)
man Richard Langton the elder, of Yorkshire, UK‏‎ #49390
Born ‎± 1437, died ‎± 1473 not sure where this came from? conflicts with other facts. Need to clear this up.‎, approximately 36 years
Richard Langton, son of John Langton Esq, was a beneficiary in the
will of his grandmother Euphemia Aske, dated 26 August 1463, "Lego
Ricardo Langton et Henrico Langton His prefati Johannis Langton j.
rope de corall inter eos dividendum" [1].

In 1485 John Sayvell, Henry Vavasour, Jacob Danby, Knight, William
Salley, Thomas Langton, and Richard Langton, esquires granted to
William Darcy, Knight, and Euphemia, his wife, the site of the
manor of Templenewsam, and of land in Templenewsam, Halton, and
Skelton, Yorkshire [2].

13 May 1505 and 29 september 1506.
http://archive.org/stream/calendarofinquis03greatage/159/mode/1up
 Married/ Related to:
8449 (4224)
woman Margaret Unknown‏‎ #49391
Died ‎after 1505
8450 (4225)
man Mayor and Sheriff william Nelson of Ricall, Yorkshire, UK‏‎ #3175
Born ‎± 1450 guess based on death, died ‎± 1525‎, approximately 75 years
land seems to be held also at fenton, lutton, sherburn. He was given houses in York, and lands in lliccall (Ricall?), Poppleton, and Sherburne in his father's will.

was Chamberlain in 1489; Sheriff, 1495-6. On Jan. 28, 1498-9, he was elected Alderman ; in 1500 he was Lord Mayor; and on Dec. 18, 1503, he was elected M.P.. an honour which was repeated in 1509, 1511-12, and 1514-15. On Jan. 15, 1516-17, being then a prisoner in the Fleet, London, he was again made Lord Mayor, to the 'gret mervaylle and dyspleasour' of the king, who set the election aside. Mr. Nelson resigned his gown Aug. 6, 1517. He marr. Jenet or Joan, dau. John Norton, Esq., of Bilbrough. Christopher, his son and heir, died at Riccall in 1554, where he had a lease of the prebend.
his will:
http://genforum.genealogy.com/nelson/messages/10932.html
 Married/ Related to:
8451 (4225)
8452 (4226)
 Married/ Related to:
8453 (4226)
generation XV (12th Great-Grandparents)

16896 (8448)
man John Langton of Farnley, Yorkshire‏‎ #2978
Born ‎before 1405, died ‎1467‎, at least 62 years
1464 - ?
http://www.archive.org/stream/oldyorkshire00unkngoog/oldyorkshire00unkngoog_djvu.txt

defended his rights to the manor and estate of Terrington, and Wiganthorpe, in 1405, and won.

a beneficiary in the will of his mother in August 1463, "Item
lego Johanni Langton filio meo unam peciam stantem cum coopertorio
cum le Moreslettris deauratis"

Ralph Thorsby writes that "In St Peter's Church, Leeds: Upon a
large Marble, are the effigies of John Langton, Esq; and his Wife,
inlaid in Brass, with vacancies for 12 Escutcheons, which have
been barbarously torn off; as is also the Head of his Statue. "Hic
iacent Johes Langton armiger filius et heres Johis Langton milit.
et Agnes uxor ejus qui obierunt in festo Sancti Lamberti Epi et
Martyris anno domini MCCCC xiiii. quor. aiabus ppicietur deus.
amen". Thoresby evidently misread the date Agnes death for he
has written 17 Sep 1414 instead of 1467. The Yorkshire
Archaeological Journal has a different transcription with the
correct date; "Hic iacent [Johannes] Langton armiger fil' & heres
Joh'is Langton Et Agnes [uxor eius qui obiit] in festo sc'i
[Lam]berti ep'i anno dn'i [MCCCCLXVII] [1467] quor ai'abz
p'picietur deus".

John Langton, squyer, son and heir of John Langton, knyght, made
his will on the xxij . day of December in the sext yere of the
reign of kyng Edwart fourt [22 Dec 1466] ... and my body to be
beried in the parish chirch of Ledes in the same place where Agnes
late wyfe tome the said John is beried, with a stone of marbill to
be laid upon us both, with a grete skochon of myn armes and of the
armes of my said wife to be sett in the mydis of the ston, with
all my doglitirs in armes with thair husbandis apon my right syde,
and and with all my sones and thair wifes in armes apon my left
side, and with all my fadir, graunsir,and auncestres in small
skochons at my hede, under the scriptur towarde departed, in lyke
wise as ye sall fynd thame at York whare myn auncestre is ther.
Also I will that the vicar of Ledes have to my corspres and my
best hors and also my seconde harnes. Also I bequeyth to the high
auter of the chirch of Ledes vj s. viij d. in recompence of all my
other dewtis if I have ony. And also to the warke of the same
chirch xx s., which I will be delivered to the kirk in aisterys
for the tyme beyng. Also I will that every prest syngyng messe in
the chirch of Ledes the day of my beryall have vj d., and every
other prest iiij d., and every clerk reding lessons ij d., and
every child syngyng in the quere j d. To every pore man, woman and
child j d. or the walow of j d ., and no almos to be gyven to thos
childre of whome the fadirs have godes to the value of xl. or
more. Also I will and charge myn executours to sheave openly emang
the peple that it is my will that no vij. day be made for me. And
if I have sufficient of godes to performe this my last will the
day of my ber yall and over them, I will that of the resydue
therof iiij l. of my mony be distribute and given be myn
executours to the pore parishyns of Ledes by the avise of the
vicar and of ij. wele trustyd men to be chose of every town of the
same parissh. Also I bequith to Seynt Petir warke of Yorke vj s.
viij d. And to every ordir of ye iiij. ordirs of Freres at York vj
s. viij d. I have made a state to Sir Henry Vavasour knyght and to
other in and of my maners of Farneley, Gargrave, Multhorp and
Clakheton and of othir landes and tenements in Farnelay,
Gairgrave, Multhorp, Clakheton, Okenshagh, Scoles, Wyksay, Lutton
upon the Wolde and Lillyng, and also of certeyn landes in Tange
and in the Cite of York, and of certyne rent in the county of
Lancastre - I will that if naythir Sir Robert Danby knyght, James
his son, nor Annes doghtir to John Langton my son newe dede and
wife to the same James - Also I will that the said Annes have a
state in like wise of the revercion of an annuite of xx. marcs
going out of the maner of Hoton Longvilers, after ye decese of
Thomas Langton and William Langton bredir to me the seid John, or
elles of the same maner, yf it may be goten for as much as it is
taild of olde tyme to me be endenture of marige made betwix Sr
Robert Nevill and Margaret his wyfe doghtir to Sir William Pole. -
bror Henry Langton.

On 22 November 1451, John Langton, esquire, by mainprise of Robert
Roos of Laxston, co. Nottingham, 'gentilman,' and Robert Langton
of Bramburgh, co. Sussex, 'gentilman,' was granted the keeping of
the king's mills below the castle of York ; to hold from the
Annunciation 28 Henry VI for 10 years, at a yearly farm of the
extent or as much as may be agreed upon between him and the
treasurer by Easter next

15 Feb.1459    Grantedthe keeping of the lands of the late Sir John Darcy and his wife, Margaret, and the marriage of William Darcy(q.v.). (C.P.R.1452-61 p.482), who he married to his daughter.

probably this one:
29 Sep.1427    Hewas a witness when William Franke(q.v.) and others quitclaimed
                        premisesin Alford, Nottinghamshire, to Sir William Ryther(q.v.). At
                        Abberforth.
                        (www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/a2adoc.ref.DD/4P/17/1)
 
 Married/ Related to:
16897 (8448)
woman Agnes "Agnes Sawley" Salley‏‎ #3105
Died ‎before 1467
16900 (8450)
man Thomas Nelson‏‎ #49387
Born ‎± 1420, died ‎± 1483‎, approximately 63 years
Thomas Nelson, merchant, was Chamberlain of York in 1442; Sheriff, 1447-8; M.P. 1452; Lord Mayor, 1454 and 1465. Will d. 4 Nov. 1478; pr. 22 March 1483-4. (Reg. Test. v. 212.)
his will:
http://genforum.genealogy.com/nelson/messages/10932.html
 Married/ Related to:
16901 (8450)
N.N.‎
16902 (8451)
 Married/ Related to:
16903 (8451)
16904 (8452)
 Married/ Related to:
16905 (8452)
generation XVI (13th Great-Grandparents)

33792 (16896)
man Sir (kt) Sheriff and MP John "John Langton" Langton of Farnley, Yorkshire, UK of Durham‏‎ #2882
Born ‎± 1390, died ‎25 Feb 1459‎, approximately 69 years
1412
wapentagium de bukros, york
johannes langeton habet dominium de mowthorpp, et eciam diversa terras etc. in heworth et lillyng, et valent etc
https://archive.org/stream/inquisitionsasse06greapage/222/mode/2up

York, HEWORTH, 1428
Johannes de Langton, miles, tenet in HEWORTH j. car. terre pro xma parte j. f., quam Henricus filius Briani quondam tenuit, et nichil, quia minus quarta parte.
https://archive.org/stream/inquisitionsasse06greapage/296/mode/2up

1428
York, west lutton
quas diverse persone modo tenent, videlicet Johannes Langton xiiij. bov.,
https://archive.org/stream/inquisitionsasse06greapage/278/mode/2up

1412
wapentagium de bukros, york
johannes langton habet terras etc. infra idem wapantachium ad valenciam vij.li.etc.
https://archive.org/stream/inquisitionsasse06greapage/100/mode/2up/search/langton
There is a monumental Inscription in St Peter's Church, Leeds: Sir
John Langton of Farnley Hall, whose Effigies in Armour (with a
Lion at his feet) and that of his Lady's are inlaid in Brass, upon
an Altar-Tomb of Marble. "Hic iacent Johannes Langton Miles &
Eufemia uxor sua qui obiit vicesimo quinto die Mensis Februarii
Anno Dom. Milmo CCCC quinquagesimo nono quorum animabus
propitietur Deus, Amen"

Recorded as having a large family:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/reader/0543687333/ref=sib_vae_pg_258?ie=UTF8&keywords=langton&p=S07J&twc=16&checkSum=7M%2BXOf%2Fi996QMMZd3Z2mPLU%2F%2B9ZEBmGXr0UYe61gIgU%3Dpage/n217/mode/2up

John Langton (Miles) On the basis of being from the same batch of Cambridge University documents, the son of the above. With his son John Langton grants Huddleston Quarry to King Henry VI in 1449.


http://www.historyofparliamentonline.org/volume/1386-1421/member/langton-sir-john-1387-1459
Constituency
Dates
YORKSHIRE1420Family and Education

b.c.1387, s. of John Langton (d. by 1413) of Mowthorpe by his w. Joan, da. of Sir Robert Neville*. m. by Mar. 1408, Euphemia (d.1463), 5s. (1 d.v.p.) 2da. Kntd. by Dec. 1420.1
Offices Held


Commr. of array, Yorks. (W. Riding) Mar. 1419; to escort Scottish hostages Feb. 1426, June 1429; make arrests Dec. 1428.

Sheriff, Yorks. by 16 June 1424-15 Jan. 1426.2
Biography

For most of the 14th century the Langton family played a leading part in the government of York, where they dominated the civic hierarchy. Between them, Nicholas Langton and John, his son, occupied the mayoralty for no less than 28 years, although their monopoly of office created tensions within the community. In 1371, for example, John Langton and his supporters among the patrician class (or viri hereditarii) were successfully challenged by a group of parvenu merchants. Such a threat may well have led John to concentrate even further on consolidating his territorial interests outside the city, although for decades already the Langtons had derived their great wealth from property rather than trade. By the time of his son’s marriage to Joan, the daughter of Sir Robert Neville of Hornby, Langton was the owner of extensive estates in Naburn, Swinefleet, Over Dinsdale, Reedness, Huddleston, Heworth, West Lutton, Mowthorpe and Huntington, as well as a number of shops and tenements in York itself. His good fortune in forging such a close connexion with one of the most powerful members of the northern gentry may, in part, have been due to the Nevilles’ accute indebtedness at the time (Sir Robert had himself married into an even wealthier mercantile family, the de la Poles, from whom his father had proceeded to borrow large sums of money), although it none the less reflects clearly enough on the growing influence and prestige of the Langtons. Having thus established themselves among the ranks of the local landowning classes, they now lived as successful rentiers, more or less abandoning their interest in civic affairs. In common with many other disaffected Yorkshiremen, John Langton the younger appears to have thrown in his lot with Archbishop Scrope of York in his rebellion against Henry IV. Certainly, in June 1405, just a few days after Scrope’s execution at York, he was pardoned all ‘treasons, insurrections and rebellions’; and, duly chastened, he henceforth lived quietly on his estates. His father-in-law, Sir Robert Neville, who was actually related by marriage to the King and was held in great favour at Court, may well have stepped in to protect him. At all events, by 1410 he had been sufficiently rehabilitated to secure employment by the Crown as a local tax collector, although his early death at some point over the next three years brought an end to any prospects of an extended career in local government.3
Langton’s son and heir, another John, the subject of this biography, first comes to notice early in 1408 when he and his wife obtained a papal indult to make use of a portable altar. According to the evidence of inquisitions post mortem on Thomas Beaufort, duke of Exeter (the husband of his cousin, Margaret Neville), he was born in about 1395, but it is most unlikely that such a licence would have been granted to a minor. He was indisputably of age by 1413, however, as Henry V then gave him permission to make an endowment upon the fraternity of St. Christopher in York in memory of his late father. Not long afterwards he became embroiled in a dispute with the hospital of St. Leonard there, perhaps as a result of rival claims to the Langton estate. By July 1416, matters had reached such a pitch that orders went out for his arrest, although arrangements were soon made in Chancery for the quarrel to go to arbitration. In the following November John was bound over in securities of 500 marks either to appear before the chancellor in person or else to produce a certificate attested by the bishop of Durham or the earl of Westmorland as proof that a private settlement had been reached. The earl did indeed provide evidence of such an award, and John’s recognizances were cancelled. Notwithstanding his initial brush with the authorities, he was appointed in March 1419 to a royal commission of array, so that by the time of his election to Parliament, late In 1420, he had gained some experience of administrative affairs. He had, moreover, been recently knighted, although the first reference to his more elevated status as a King’s knight does not occur until the reign of Henry VI. Royal patronage began coming his way in February 1423, when, possibly through the influence of his kinsman by marriage, the duke of Exeter, he and Sir John Asshe were given joint custody of the Yorkshire, Lincolnshire, Essex and Kent estates declared forfeit after the death of Margery, dowager Lady Scrope, mother of the traitor, Henry, Lord Scrope of Masham. Sir John also stood well with the influential cleric, Robert Wycliffe, chancellor and receiver-general to the bishop of Durham and sometime constable of Durham castle. On his death in 1423, Wycliffe left him a covered goblet, while his son, Robert (who evidently died young), was promised a bed with red worsted draperies bearing the arms of Wycliffe.4
By late June 1424 Sir John had assumed office as sheriff of Yorkshire, in which capacity he was responsible for the custody of a group of 15 Scottish hostages. Besides having to offer personal securities of £1,000 that they would not escape, he sustained heavy expenses while keeping them safe in York castle. The allowance of £83 made to him by the Crown proved totally inadequate, and in November 1427 (by which time his prisoners had been transferred to the Tower of London) he claimed a further £160 to cover his outlay. By this date, however, Sir John’s financial prospects had improved dramatically. The death without issue first of his cousin, Margaret Neville, and then of her husband, the duke of Exeter, left him and his aunt, Margaret Haryngton, coheirs to the rich and widespread estates of Sir Robert Neville of Hornby. Exeter died in December 1426, and although five years elapsed before a mutually acceptable division of property could be achieved, Sir John eventually found himself in possession of the manor of Appleby in Lincolnshire, rents in the Lancashire villages of Aintree and Melling, and all his late grandfather’s extensive holdings in Yorkshire. These comprised the manor of Farnley near Leeds, and at least 13 other manors with appurtenances spread throughout the West Riding and beyond. Sir William Haryngton, Margaret’s husband, may not have been content with the castle and lordship of Hornby in Lancashire, which constituted his share of the inheritance, for he was obliged to enter bonds worth £1,000 as a guarantee of Sir John’s undisputed title.5
Meanwhile, in 1429, Sir John acted as a parliamentary proxy for John Wells, the bishop of Llandaff. So far as we know, he did not himself sit in more than one Parliament, nor did he devote much time from this date onwards to official responsibilities of any kind, choosing rather to concentrate on the management of his estates. From 1441 onwards, his eldest surviving son, John (who took over the running of the family property at Farnley), assumed a leading role in Yorkshire society, although his failure to find adequate securities meant that he never actually occupied the post of bailiff of Pickering offered to him by the Crown. His brother, Henry, did, however, prosper in the employment of Henry VI, serving first as clerk and crier of the Marshalsea, and then becoming an esquire of the royal household. Sir John never forgot his family’s early connexion with the city of York, and towards the end of his life he endowed the new guild of St. Martin with property for the support of a perpetual chantry. He chose, even so, to be buried in the church of St. Peter, Leeds, where John Langton the younger later erected a large and impressive family tomb.6
Sir John Langton died on 17 Mar. 1459, leaving four sons and two daughters. His widow, Euphemia, lived on until 1463, and was buried beside him at St. Peter’s. In her will she bequeathed large quantities of expensive plate and jewels to various friends, relatives and religious houses. To the parish church of Sherburn-in-Elmet, for example, went an alabaster image of the Virgin with a collar of gold and silver and a lavish display of ornaments. Her younger son, Henry, inherited a missal called ‘Bishop Scrope boke’, which suggests that memories of the 1405 rebellion still remained strong among the Langtons.7
Ref Volumes: 1386-1421
Author: C.R.


Notes

1. CP, v. 203-4; Test. Ebor. i. 404-5; ii. 258-60, 277-9; VCH Yorks. (N. Riding), ii. 204; VCH City of York, 70-71; CPL, vi. 145; CPR, 1413-16, p. 55.
2. PRO, List ‘Sheriffs’, 162 gives Sir John’s date of appointment as 6 Nov. 1424, but he was clearly in office by 16 June of that year (CCR, 1422-9, p. 182).
3. VCH City of York, 70-71; VCH Yorks. (N. Riding), ii. 146, 204; Peds. Plea Rolls ed. Wrottesley, 248-9; CFR, xiii. 180; CPR, 1405-8, p. 49; Feudal Aids, vi. 264, 547, 550.
4. CPL, vi. 145; CPR, 1413-16, p. 55; 1416-22, p. 81; CCR, 1413-19, pp. 372, 455-6; CFR, xv. 28; Test. Ebor. i. 404-5.
5. E404/44/154; CCR, 1422-9, p. 182; 1435-41, pp. 170-1; Yorks. Arch. Soc. Rec. Ser. cxx. 61-63; CFR, xv. 264-5; xvi. 31, 75, 87, 137-40; CP, v. 203-4.
6. SC10/48/2391; Yorks. Arch. Soc. Rec. Ser. cxx. 64; Somerville, Duchy, i. 536; CPR, 1441-6, p. 442; 1446-52, p. 62; CCR, 1441-7, p. 64; Yorks. Arch. Jnl. xv. 31-32; Test. Ebor. ii. 277-9.
7. C139/175/3; Test. Ebor. ii. 258-60.


-- MERGED NOTE ------------

http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=64729

Robert de Wycliffe of Wycliffe (durham) died 1423. In 1412 he settled the manor and advowson of Wycliffe on himself with remainders to (1) Sir Thomas Pykworth, kt., and the children of Ellen his late wife, (2) John son of John de Ellerton and his heirs male, who were to assume the cognomen of Wycliffe and bear the ancient arms, (3) Robert son of John de Langton (fn. 31) and Thomas son of John de la Mare. (fn. 32) Thus John de Wycliffe, who was lord in 1428, (fn. 33) may have been John son of John de Ellerton (fn. 34) and represent a new dynasty of Wycliffes.

John Langton of Yorkshire, was executor of Thomas de le Mare. However, he could, perhaps, be a local John Langton of the local Durham Langton family nearby to Wycliffe village.
 Married/ Related to:
33793 (16896)
33794 (16897)
 Married/ Related to:
33795 (16897)
N.N.‎
33808 (16904)
 Married/ Related to:
33809 (16904)
generation XVII (14th Great-Grandparents)

67584 (33792)
man Lord John Langton of Huddleston, Yorkshire‏‎ #1062
Born ‎± 1362, died ‎before 1406 Farnley, Yorkshire, England‎
1373 his wardship and marriage was sold to William Gray (Grey?) citizen of York and Robet de Wyclif, rector of St. Crux.

His father in law is said to have owned the manor of Farnley before. But Huddleston etc was owned by the Langtons through the de Melsa marriage.

This John described as a country gentleman.

The church of ALL SAINTS, Peaseholme Green, is first mentioned in a document dated between 1191 and 1206 in terms that suggest that it had been founded early in the 12th century. It was said by the citizens of York to be in the fee of Ralf Nuvel (about whom little else is known) and it is implied that it had been built by his ancestor. (fn. 2) The advowson remained in lay hands: the le Grant family presented in 1275 and 1292 (fn. 3) and were succeeded by the Salvayn family, one of whom had married a le Grant heiress. (fn. 4) Between 1337 and 1469 presentations were made by Nicholas de Langton and his descendants. In 1471 William Eure presented and in 1515 the assigns of Christopher Danby. (fn. 5) In 1582 the advowson was owned by Elizabeth Kellet of Heworth.

The lands of Thomas, late duke of Exeter, and Margaret late his
wife, daughter and heir of Thomas Nevill, were divided between
John Langton, knight, and Margaret, wife of William Haryngton,
knight, kinsfolk and heirs of Margaret the duchess, the said John
being son of Joan one of the sisters of the said Thomas Nevill,
and the said Margaret being the other sister of the same Thomas.
The manors of Great Farneley, Little Farneley, Okenshawe,
Clakeheton, Scoles, Collyng, Conyngley, Gairgrave, Poterton,
Brymston, Kyrkeby upon Wharf, Northmylford and Hoton Longvillers
Yorkshire, and the manor of Appilby, Lincolnshire, were allotted
to the pourparty of John Langton, and the castle and manor of
Horneby Lancashire, to the pourparty of Margaret. The kings
licence was not obtained in these transfers, and John and Margaret
sued in chancery to have the premises, but owing to a diversity of
opinion among the judges and other learned men of the king's
council in the chancery, they were not able to obtain them. In
1433, the king pardoned the trespasses and granted that the
petitioners may have the premises

This John? At Ripon...
http://sdrc.lib.uiowa.edu/patentrolls/h4v3/body/Henry4vol3page0049.pdf

Assumed to be this John: 18Apr.1406    He held land in Bootham.    (Yorkshire Deeds IX pp.191-2)

Commr. of array, Yorks. (W. Riding) Mar. 1419; to escort Scottish hostages Feb. 1426, June 1429; make arrests Dec. 1428.
Sheriff, Yorks. by 16 June 1424-15 Jan. 1426
http://www.historyofparliamentonline.org/volume/1386-1421/member/langton-sir-john-1387-1459
 Married ‎before Mar 1408 to:
67585 (33792)
woman Joan Neville of Yorkshire‏‎ #1063
Born ‎1380 Farnley, Yorkshire, England
67586 (33793)
 Married/ Related to:
67587 (33793)
N.N.‎
67616 (33808)
man Edmond Pynchard‏‎ #49523
Born ‎before 1389
source: Glos. visitation 1623:
http://archive.org/stream/visitationofcoun00inchitage/204/mode/2up/search/bassett

http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/SearchUI/Details/AddtoBasket?iaid=C9295777
Order and viewing options: Free
2 pages totalling 890 KB across 1 PDF file(s) Add to basket View at The National Archives for free
Reference:SC 8/198/9888
Description: Petitioners: Walter Broun (Brown), King's tenant of the manor of Lasborough, by right of his wife.
Name(s): Broun (Brown), Walter
Addressees: Lords and commons of parliament.
Nature of request: Walter Broun makes two complaints:1) He states that in the fifty-first year of the King's grandfather, Maud Basset and others, her kin and servants, broke into his house at Lasborough, attacked him, abducted his wife and son and stole his charters and muniments, goods and money, and carried them off to Uley, where they kept them for six days and nights. They are still holding his charters and muniments. He has sued against them by writ, but can have no remedy because of the maintenance of lords and the delays of sheriffs. He requests a remedy.2) He states that Nicholas Berkeleie, Maud Basset and twenty-eight others came to his manor with force and arms on the Wednesday after Easter in the first year of the reign of the present King, broke into his house, attacked him, and burnt his hall and chamber down, frightening his pregnant wife so that she lost her child. They then carried him off to Dursley castle, and held him until he paid a ransom to save his life, goods and chattels. Because of this he can have no profit from his manor and is in fear of his life; but can have no remedy at law because of maintenance. He requests a remedy.
Nature of endorsement: The plaintiff in these petitions is to find pledges to sue them, and when this has been done the defendants are to be instructed by writ of Chancery to be before the King's council on a certain day to answer to the plaintiff concerning the things contained in the petitions; and the defendants on their arrival are to be put under arrest until they have found sufficient security to keep the peace and to do what will be adjudged by the King's council and the law of the land. And the council [will do with] the said malefactors . . . what seems best to them to be done in this case.Walter Broun has found pledges to sue: John Broun of the county of Devon, Henry [Illegible] of the county of Cornwall.
Places mentioned: Lasborough, [Gloucestershire]; Uley, [Gloucestershire]; Dursley, [Gloucestershire]; Devon; Cornwall.
People mentioned: Maud Basset, widow of Simon Basset, knight; Simon Basset, knight; Maurice Basset; Edmund Basset the son; John Sculle; John Stuteshull; William Tracy, tailor; John Chapelein; Nicholas Cook; Edward [III], King of England; Margaret [Broun (Brown)], wife of Walter Broun (Brown); John Broun (Brown), son and heir of Broun (Brown); Nicholas Berkeleie; William [Missing due to damage to ms]; [Missing due to damage to ms] Waleys; Matthew Pope; John Bond; John Copener; Roger Stuteshulle; Thomas Coper; John Millbank; William [...]; Henry [Broun (Brown)], son of Walter Broun (Brown); John Broun (Brown) of Devon, Henry [...] of Cornwall.
Date derivation: Rot. Parl. vol. III, p.463a-464a, quotes a plea held in Michaelmas term 13 Richard II (1389), from which it would appear that Maud was dead by then. This petition would therefore appear to date from the reign of Richard II, before 1389, and probably from quite early in the reign.

Note: Rot. Parl. vol. III, p.463a-464a, quotes a plea held in Michaelmas term 13 Richard II (1389), from which it would appear that Maud was dead by then. This petition would therefore appear to date from the reign of Richard II, before 1389, and probably from quite early in the reign.
 Married/ Related to:
67617 (33808)
67618 (33809)
 Married/ Related to:
67619 (33809)
N.N.‎
generation XVIII (15th Great-Grandparents)

135168 (67584)
man Citizen and Mercer John Langton of York‏‎ #56734
Died ‎before Nov 1373
Died shortly after his father.  He died before November 1373 when the wardship and marriage of John son and heir of John de Langton of York was granted to William Gray, citizen of York, and Robert de Wyclif, rector of St. Crux, York.

Was described in 1413 by his son John III as "citizen and mercer of York."
 Married/ Related to:
135169 (67584)
135170 (67585)
man Lord Robert Neville of Hornby, Lancashire‏‎ #1065
Born ‎1323 Hornby, Yorkshire, England, died ‎1413‎, 89 or 90 years
manors of Brearley, Farnley, Gargrave, and others
http://www.archive.org/stream/cu31924084250624/cu31924084250624_djvu.txt
 Married/ Related to:
135171 (67585)
135232 (67616)
man Symon "Symon Basset" Pynchard‏‎ #49610
Died ‎before 1389
http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/SearchUI/Details/AddtoBasket?iaid=C9295777
Order and viewing options

Free

2 pages totalling 890 KB across 1 PDF file(s) Add to basket View at The National Archives for free
Reference:SC 8/198/9888
Description: Petitioners: Walter Broun (Brown), King's tenant of the manor of Lasborough, by right of his wife.
Name(s): Broun (Brown), Walter
Addressees: Lords and commons of parliament.
Nature of request: Walter Broun makes two complaints:1) He states that in the fifty-first year of the King's grandfather, Maud Basset and others, her kin and servants, broke into his house at Lasborough, attacked him, abducted his wife and son and stole his charters and muniments, goods and money, and carried them off to Uley, where they kept them for six days and nights. They are still holding his charters and muniments. He has sued against them by writ, but can have no remedy because of the maintenance of lords and the delays of sheriffs. He requests a remedy.2) He states that Nicholas Berkeleie, Maud Basset and twenty-eight others came to his manor with force and arms on the Wednesday after Easter in the first year of the reign of the present King, broke into his house, attacked him, and burnt his hall and chamber down, frightening his pregnant wife so that she lost her child. They then carried him off to Dursley castle, and held him until he paid a ransom to save his life, goods and chattels. Because of this he can have no profit from his manor and is in fear of his life; but can have no remedy at law because of maintenance. He requests a remedy.
Nature of endorsement: The plaintiff in these petitions is to find pledges to sue them, and when this has been done the defendants are to be instructed by writ of Chancery to be before the King's council on a certain day to answer to the plaintiff concerning the things contained in the petitions; and the defendants on their arrival are to be put under arrest until they have found sufficient security to keep the peace and to do what will be adjudged by the King's council and the law of the land. And the council [will do with] the said malefactors . . . what seems best to them to be done in this case.Walter Broun has found pledges to sue: John Broun of the county of Devon, Henry [Illegible] of the county of Cornwall.
Places mentioned: Lasborough, [Gloucestershire]; Uley, [Gloucestershire]; Dursley, [Gloucestershire]; Devon; Cornwall.
People mentioned: Maud Basset, widow of Simon Basset, knight; Simon Basset, knight; Maurice Basset; Edmund Basset the son; John Sculle; John Stuteshull; William Tracy, tailor; John Chapelein; Nicholas Cook; Edward [III], King of England; Margaret [Broun (Brown)], wife of Walter Broun (Brown); John Broun (Brown), son and heir of Broun (Brown); Nicholas Berkeleie; William [Missing due to damage to ms]; [Missing due to damage to ms] Waleys; Matthew Pope; John Bond; John Copener; Roger Stuteshulle; Thomas Coper; John Millbank; William [...]; Henry [Broun (Brown)], son of Walter Broun (Brown); John Broun (Brown) of Devon, Henry [...] of Cornwall.
Date derivation: Rot. Parl. vol. III, p.463a-464a, quotes a plea held in Michaelmas term 13 Richard II (1389), from which it would appear that Maud was dead by then. This petition would therefore appear to date from the reign of Richard II, before 1389, and probably from quite early in the reign.

Note: Rot. Parl. vol. III, p.463a-464a, quotes a plea held in Michaelmas term 13 Richard II (1389), from which it would appear that Maud was dead by then. This petition would therefore appear to date from the reign of Richard II, before 1389, and probably from quite early in the reign.
 Married/ Related to:
135233 (67616)
woman Maud Unknown‏‎ #49611
Died ‎± 1389
http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/SearchUI/Details/AddtoBasket?iaid=C9295777
Order and viewing options

Free

2 pages totalling 890 KB across 1 PDF file(s) Add to basket View at The National Archives for free
Reference:SC 8/198/9888
Description: Petitioners: Walter Broun (Brown), King's tenant of the manor of Lasborough, by right of his wife.
Name(s): Broun (Brown), Walter
Addressees: Lords and commons of parliament.
Nature of request: Walter Broun makes two complaints:1) He states that in the fifty-first year of the King's grandfather, Maud Basset and others, her kin and servants, broke into his house at Lasborough, attacked him, abducted his wife and son and stole his charters and muniments, goods and money, and carried them off to Uley, where they kept them for six days and nights. They are still holding his charters and muniments. He has sued against them by writ, but can have no remedy because of the maintenance of lords and the delays of sheriffs. He requests a remedy.2) He states that Nicholas Berkeleie, Maud Basset and twenty-eight others came to his manor with force and arms on the Wednesday after Easter in the first year of the reign of the present King, broke into his house, attacked him, and burnt his hall and chamber down, frightening his pregnant wife so that she lost her child. They then carried him off to Dursley castle, and held him until he paid a ransom to save his life, goods and chattels. Because of this he can have no profit from his manor and is in fear of his life; but can have no remedy at law because of maintenance. He requests a remedy.
Nature of endorsement: The plaintiff in these petitions is to find pledges to sue them, and when this has been done the defendants are to be instructed by writ of Chancery to be before the King's council on a certain day to answer to the plaintiff concerning the things contained in the petitions; and the defendants on their arrival are to be put under arrest until they have found sufficient security to keep the peace and to do what will be adjudged by the King's council and the law of the land. And the council [will do with] the said malefactors . . . what seems best to them to be done in this case.Walter Broun has found pledges to sue: John Broun of the county of Devon, Henry [Illegible] of the county of Cornwall.
Places mentioned: Lasborough, [Gloucestershire]; Uley, [Gloucestershire]; Dursley, [Gloucestershire]; Devon; Cornwall.
People mentioned: Maud Basset, widow of Simon Basset, knight; Simon Basset, knight; Maurice Basset; Edmund Basset the son; John Sculle; John Stuteshull; William Tracy, tailor; John Chapelein; Nicholas Cook; Edward [III], King of England; Margaret [Broun (Brown)], wife of Walter Broun (Brown); John Broun (Brown), son and heir of Broun (Brown); Nicholas Berkeleie; William [Missing due to damage to ms]; [Missing due to damage to ms] Waleys; Matthew Pope; John Bond; John Copener; Roger Stuteshulle; Thomas Coper; John Millbank; William [...]; Henry [Broun (Brown)], son of Walter Broun (Brown); John Broun (Brown) of Devon, Henry [...] of Cornwall.
Date derivation: Rot. Parl. vol. III, p.463a-464a, quotes a plea held in Michaelmas term 13 Richard II (1389), from which it would appear that Maud was dead by then. This petition would therefore appear to date from the reign of Richard II, before 1389, and probably from quite early in the reign.

Note: Rot. Parl. vol. III, p.463a-464a, quotes a plea held in Michaelmas term 13 Richard II (1389), from which it would appear that Maud was dead by then. This petition would therefore appear to date from the reign of Richard II, before 1389, and probably from quite early in the reign.
generation XIX (16th Great-Grandparents)

270336 (135168)
man Sir (Mayor) Parson John "John Langton" Langton of Huddleston (or York) of Bulmer, Yorkshire‏‎ #2883
Born ‎± 1310, died ‎Mar 1372‎, approximately 62 years
Assume it was this John who was as follows:
1347 - John Langton (Baliff)
1353-1361 & 1363 - John Langton (Mayor)
Founded the St. Anthony's hospital, York.
He was a knight.

Read here for details on his Mayority and falling out with others in power in York:
http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=T7Jl6LgZSVUC&pg=PA345&lpg=PA345&dq=%22ralph+langton%22+hull&source=bl&ots=kujG2hrrLH&sig=FmU0wHpo3Y49EkdKAFNzErA0K2I&hl=en&ei=xlAbTL_vL9OG4gbro73SCg&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=4&ved=0CCgQ6AEwAwpage/28/mode/2up/search/langeton

2 Sep 1338: http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=ancestorsearch&id=I37133
2 September 1338, Grant by John de Melsa, knight son of Godfrey de
Melsa, to John de Langeton, son of Nicholas de Langeton of York,
of the whole manor of Huddlestone with land there and in Sherburn
and Milford; to hold for his life with all the profits, etc.
belonging, at the yearly rent of 24 marks of silver, all trees
other than fruit trees being reserved, save for the grantee's
repairs. Witnesses, William de Raygate, John de Fenton, John de
Shirburen, etc.

On 30 January 1343/4, John de Langton, son of Nicholas, did homage to Archbishop Zouche for his lands in Huddleston. He first had these lands by rental from John de Meux, son of Godfrey de Meux in 1338.

1346.
Yorkshire
HESELYNGTON
de Johanne filio Nicholai de Langeton pro x bov. terre de feodo comitis Richmundie, unde xij,, etc.
https://archive.org/stream/inquisitionsasse06greapage/234/mode/2up

1346
langton [near Malton]
...Johannes de Langeton iiij. bov.,...
https://archive.org/stream/inquisitionsasse06greaage/236/mode/2up

1351, probably this John, and his mates, giving someone a hiding:
http://sdrc.lib.uiowa.edu/patentrolls/e3v9/body/Edward3vol9page0079.pdf

8 Feb 1355: http://www.robinhoodloxley.net/mycustompage0032.htm
On 8 Ides of February 1355, John de Langeton, donsel, of the
diocese of York, had a papal indult to choose a confessor who
shall give him plenary remission at the hour of death

31 July 1355, Defeasance of a grant by John de Melsa, knight son
of Godfrey de Melsa, to John de Langeton, son of Nicholas de
Langeton of York, of the manor of Huddlestone and all lands there
and in South Fenton and Biggin - in the event of Sir John [de
Melsa] having an heir male who in the year following his death,
whatever might then be his age, should pay to John de Langton, his
executors or assigns, the sum of 400 marks of sterlings, together
with all costs and expenses incurred by him or them in the
premises

1 August 1355, Deed witnessing the attornment by John de Langton
to John de Melsa knight for an annual rent of 29 marks recently
granted by John de Langton to John de Melsa, for his life out of
all the lands and tenements of John de Langton in Huddlestone next
Shirburn and South Fenton, and further charging with the payment
of such rent all his lands and tenements in Heslington and heworth
next York

1355/1362/ Kent Archive:
http://www.kentarchives.org.uk/CalmView/Record.aspx?src=CalmView.Catalog&id=CCA-DCc-ChAnt%2fY%2f16&pos=11

1356 May 6 Commission, pursuant to the statute of the Parliament at Westminster, 25 Edward III,* to Thomas Ughtred, William Basset, William Malbys, John de Langeton of York and John Moubray, to survey and enquire by the oath of good men of the county of York touching all weirs, mills, stanks, stakes and kiddles raised in the waters of Ouse, Ayre, Done, Wherf, Swale, Nidde and Derewent, from the time of the king's grandfather, and to remove any that obstruct those waters. [25 Edward III. stat. 3,cap. 4.] Edward III, vol. 10, p. 400* This statute relates only to navigation
http://www.riveraccessforall.co.uk/docs/totally_compelling_evidence.pdf

On 26 September 1358 Thomas de la Mare, Canon of St Peter's, York
makes 'Johannem de Langeton de Ebor', one of his executors, he
also mentions Marjory de Langton his cousin - but I can't work out
this relationship.

1360 Aug 16 Commission, pursuant to 25 Edward III*, [Stat. 3, cap. iv.]t to Thomas Ughtred, John Moubray, John de Langeton of York, Illard de Usflete et Hamo de Hessay to survey all weirs, mills, stanks, stakes and kiddles, in the waters of Ouse, Ayre, Done, Wherf, Nidd and Derwent, co. York, and remove any that obstruct the passage of boats. Edward III, vol. 11, p. 422 (* This statute relates onlyto navigation)

1361 July 1Commission pursuant to 25 Edward III*, stat. [3,cap. 4],to William de Skipwyth, Thomas de Ingelby, Illard de Usflete,John de Langeton, Henryde Barton,Thomas de Egmanton, Thomas de Wythornwyk and John de Feryby,to survey kiddles and weirs in the waters and rivers of Use, Ayre, Derwent, Querf, Yore, Swale, Nidd, Hull and Don and to make inquisition by the oath of good men of the counties adjacent to those rivers whether any of these obstruct the passage.Edward III, vol. 11, p. 583 (* This statute relates only to navigation. See also the next commission)

In 1364 Nicholas Salvin (his 2nd cousin) granted the manor of Mowthorpe in Terrington with all goods and chattels thereon to John de Langton, Mayor of York, and son of Nicholas de Langton of York. He died after January 1372 when he is last mentioned in the Patent Rolls. John and Beatrice had at least one child: John II, their son and heir.
 Married ‎before Feb 1329 This text suggests that the marriage was in 1329 and that he was born about 1310. But we think it was probably a little earlier, in both cases. Beatrix cant really be daughter of the Beatrix Huddleston because the dates don't fit, so we arent confident in this source.

John de Langton I, born about 1310, had a fortunate marriage about 1329, with Beatrice, daughter of Godfrey de Meux, whose mother was Beatrice de Huddleston, heiress of the manor of Huddleston in the West Riding.
(at least 43 years married) to:
270337 (135168)
woman Beatrice "Beatrice Melsa" de Meaux‏‎ #3089
Born ‎± 1305
Beatrix must be John's sister, not his daughter, else the dates don't fit and make sense. Both Beatrix and John are known to have been underage at the death of their father and their wardships were given.

York. Octave of the Purification, 3 Edw. III, 1329. John son of
Nicholas de Langeton and Beatrice his wife, by Thomas de Milford,
guardian of the said Beatrice, quer., Nicholas de Langeton and
Mary his wife, def., of four tofts, 6 bovates of land, and;4l.
rent, in Overdidensale,' Swynflet and Redenesse : To hold to John
and Beatrice and the heirs of their bodies, of Nicholas and Mary
and the heirs of Nicholas, paying yearly a rose at the Nativity of
St. John Baptist for all service to them, and doing all services
due to the chief lords ; reversion to Nicholas and Mary and the
heirs of Nicholas.
270464 (135232)
 Married/ Related to:
270465 (135232)
generation XX (17th Great-Grandparents)

540672 (270336)
man Lord (Mayor) Nicholas "Nicholas Langton, Nicholao de Langeton" Langton of Heworth, (York) of Grimstone, Yorkshire‏‎ #2884
Born ‎± 1275, died ‎after 1301‎
1294:
Debtor: Amabilla Basset, Roger de Bulmer, the son of Sir John de Bulmer [lord of Welburn and Bulmer, Bulmer Wapentake, N.R.Yorks] Adam de Fowthorpe , and ?Henry le Despenser.Creditor: Nicholas de Langton, and Nicholas his son [merchants of York]Amount: 3 sacks of good wool, at 10m. a sack; and £4 4s. 2d.Before whom: John de Meaux, Warden of York; Robert de Seizevaux, Clerk.First term: 06/06/1294Last term: 06/06/1294Writ to: Sheriff of YorksSent by: John de Meaux, Warden of York; Robert de Seizevaux, Clerk.

Eldest son Nicholas was certified Lord of Heworth, West Lutton, Yorkshire in 1316.
1322 - appointed keeper of the Archbishops palace and prison in York.
Mayor of York - 1322-33 and again 1338-41.

1322-1333 & 1338, 1340-42 - Nicholas Langton (Mayor) [eldest son of former Mayor]

1322/23/42 record, witness (this record and several others in the Kent archive):
http://www.kentarchives.org.uk/CalmView/Record.aspx?src=CalmView.Catalog&id=CCA-DCc-ChAnt%2fY%2f3&pos=6

http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=36336&strquery=langton%20OR%20langtun%20OR%20langeton%20OR%20lankton%20OR%20lancton

The church of ALL SAINTS, Peaseholme Green, is first mentioned in a document dated between 1191 and 1206 in terms that suggest that it had been founded early in the 12th century. It was said by the citizens of York to be in the fee of Ralf Nuvel (about whom little else is known) and it is implied that it had been built by his ancestor. (fn. 2) The advowson remained in lay hands: the le Grant family presented in 1275 and 1292 (fn. 3) and were succeeded by the Salvayn family, one of whom had married a le Grant heiress. (fn. 4) Between 1337 and 1469 presentations were made by Nicholas de Langton and his descendants. In 1471 William Eure presented and in 1515 the assigns of Christopher Danby. (fn. 5) In 1582 the advowson was owned by Elizabeth Kellet of Heworth.

Quitclaim SpSt/4/11/134/1 4 May 1325
Language: Latin
Contents:
Between Emma daughter of Richard Marescallus of York, widow of Elyas de Wyndhill, of the one part, and Sir William de Skeryngton, chaplain, of the other part; of all her right in land and buildings etc. on the road of North Street, York, which Sir William had of the gift of Emma; the land extends in length from the Royal Street of North Street to the land John de Catton holds, and in width between the land once of Andrew de Bolyngbrok on the east, and the land once of Thomas de Dockedik on the west.
Witnesses: Philip de Langeton, then Mayor of the City of York, Thomas de Bilham, John de Housum, John de Catton, Robert de Raysebeck, and others.
Seal: missing, on tag.
Endorsed: 1325. Illa. Northstrete.
THIS CANNOT BE CORRECT. IT WAS NICHOLAS WHO WAS MAYOR AT THIS DATE. THEREFORE THIS A TRANSCRIPTION ERROR OR PHILIP LANGETON EXISTS BUT IS NOT MAYOR.

http://www.archive.org/stream/feetoffinesforco42bailpage/n339/mode/2up/search/langeton
 Married/ Related to:
540673 (270336)
540674 (270337)
man Godfrey "Godfrey Melsa" de Meaux‏‎ #49354
Born ‎± 1265 a guess based on other events., died ‎± 1310 a guess based on other events.‎, approximately 45 years
1304 - A grant of the custody of the lands of Godfrey de Melsa, at Hodelston, to Robert de Grenefeld and William, his son. (but given the below source with a later date, is this date a mistake?)

and, 1311:
http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=h7wHAAAAQAAJ&pg=PA21&vq=Grenefeld&output=html_text&source=gbs_search_r&cad=1 :
On Thursday the feast of the purification of the Blessed Virgin Mary, 1311, Robert de Grenefield and William his son were made guardians of the lands of Godfrey de Melsa at Huddleston, on account of the minority of John his son and heir. Fasti Eboracenses. This Godfrey, like John de Melsa, was the head of the Holderness family. In the 5th Edward II., "William de Melton flnem fecit cumtR. per centum lib* pro custodia manerii de Bewyk cum membris de Walkington, Aldeburgh et Danethorpe et omnium terrarnm et ten'iuWilardeby, Waldeby, Newton et Hadon que fuerunt Godcfredi de Melsa def."

more here:
http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=ancestorsearch&id=I37133
2 September 1338, Grant by John de Melsa, knight son of Godfrey de Melsa, to John de Langeton, son of Nicholas de Langeton of York, of the whole manor of Huddlestone with land there and in Sherburn and Milford; to hold for his life with all the profits, etc. belonging, at the yearly rent of 24 marks of silver, all trees other than fruit trees being reserved, save for the grantee's repairs. Witnesses, William de Raygate, John de Fenton, John de Shirburen, etc.
On 30 January 1343/4, John de Langton, son of Nicholas, did homage to Archbishop Zouche for his lands in Huddleston. He first had these lands by rental from John de Meux, son of Godfrey de Meux in 1338.
---
John de Melsa* was then summoned, and he stated that as regards feudal rights (secta) he held the manors of Hudleston...
* On Thursday the feast of the purification of the Blessed Virgin Mary, 1311, Robert de Grenefield and William his son were made guardians of the lands of Godfrey de Melsa at Huddleston, on account of the minority of John his son and heir. Fasti Eboracenses. This Godfrey, like John de Melsa, was head of the Holderness family.
[He was living 5 Edw II.]
-
Among the escheats 4th Edward II., we find the list of estates formed by Godfrey de Melsa, and from it we learn that he ... In 1335, Elena, the widow of Godfrey, died, and the custody of all her land in Holderness was given to Simon de ...
(The history of the parishes of Sherburn and Cawood. Page 21. William Wheater. 1865.)
---
On the 4th May, 1353, license was granted to Sir John Meaux, Knight, to have the bones of Godfrey Meaux, his great-grandfather, John Meaux, his grandfather, Godfrey Meaux, his father, and Scolastica and Joan, his sisters, removed from the church of Aldborough to the priory of Hautemprice, in consequence of the encroachments of the sea : they are to be buried in a place in which, as we understand, Sir John himself intends to be interred. Sir John Meaux, to whom the license was granted, was buried at Aldborough, and not at Hautemprice, in 1377. A rich altar tomb, which bears his effigy, commemorates him, ...
---
St. Bartholomew's church in Aldbrough dates from the second half of the 14th century. This would suggest it was built after the first church was givne up to the coastal erosion? [RH]
---
In 1149 or 1150 William le Gros, count of Aumale, granted an estate at Bewick to John of Meaux in exchange. (fn. 37) By 1182 John of Meaux had been succeeded by his son Robert, whose widow Maud was granted a carucate and rents at Bewick for dower by their son (Sir) John in 1196. (fn. 38) John added 1 carucate at Bewick and 1 carucate at Thorpe by exchange with Michael Darcy and Meaux abbey respectively. (fn. 39) His son Godfrey had 3 carucates at Bewick in the mid 13th century; by the 1280s the Aumale undertenant was Godfrey's son (Sir) John (d. by 1308), who was granted free warren there and elsewhere in Aldbrough in 1299, (fn. 40) and whose estate in 1303 was called BEWICK manor. (fn. 41) At the death by 1311 of John's son Godfrey most of Bewick manor and 1 carucate and 2 bovates at Aldbrough, described as a member of Bewick, were held of the honor of Aumale by knight service; the rest of the manor, with 2 bovates at Bewick, was said to be held by like service of the provost of Beverley. (fn. 42) Godfrey's son Sir John died c. 1377 and his heirs sold the manor in 1379 to Sir Ralph Hastings.
---
John de Melsa, knight son of Godfrey de Melsa. ... On 1 Aug 1336, similarly described, he granted two messuages in Bubwith to his kinsman John de Meaux, son of Sir John de Meaux his uncle; and on 2 Sept. 1338 he granted to John son of Nicholas de Langton of York for life the manor of Huddleston with land in Sherburn and Milford at a yearly rent of 24 marks of silver. On 23 July 1340 John son of Sir John de Meaux of Billinghay [co. ...
(The Yorkshire archaeological journal: Volumes 43-44. 1971.)
 Married/ Related to:
540675 (270337)
540930 (270465)
man Anselme Basset‏‎ #49617

source: glos. visitation
 Married/ Related to:
540931 (270465)
N.N.‎
generation XXI (18th Great-Grandparents)

1081344 (540672)
man Baliff and Mayor Nicholas Langton of Towthorpe, Earswick, Huntington, Heworth, Skelt‏‎ #2886
Born ‎± 1250, died ‎between Jul 1322 and 21 Apr 1324‎, 73 or 74 years
could be a relation of william langton ID9309.

Exported wool to Flanders in 1272:
From: 'The twelfth and thirteenth centuries: Occupations and distribution of wealth', A History of the County of York: the City of York (1961), pp. 41-47. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=36321&strquery=langton

York Civic Positions:
1285 (or 1286-7) - Nich. Langton (Baliff)
1297 - Nich. Langton (Mayor)
1306 - Nich. Langton (Mayor)

1291 Jun 20:
Debtor: Thomas de Gunby [E.R., Yorks.], knight. Creditor: Nicholas de Langton [citizen and merchant of York]. Amount: £4 10s., for cloth.
http://bubwith.net/data/equity-chancery.htm

1294:
Debtor: William Basset, knight, and Anabilla Basset.Creditor: Nicholas de Langton [citizen and merchant of York]Amount: £4.Before whom: John de Meaux, Warden of York; Robert de Seizevaux, Clerk.First term: 04/09/1294Last term: 04/09/1294Writ to: Sheriff of YorksSent by: John de Byron, Warden of York; Robert de Seizevaux, Clerk.
http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/SearchUI/Details?uri=C9598139

1294:
Debtor: Amabilla Basset, Roger de Bulmer, the son of Sir John de Bulmer [lord of Welburn and Bulmer, Bulmer Wapentake, N.R.Yorks] Adam de Fowthorpe , and ?Henry le Despenser.Creditor: Nicholas de Langton, and Nicholas his son [merchants of York]Amount: 3 sacks of good wool, at 10m. a sack; and £4 4s. 2d.Before whom: John de Meaux, Warden of York; Robert de Seizevaux, Clerk.First term: 06/06/1294Last term: 06/06/1294Writ to: Sheriff of YorksSent by: John de Meaux, Warden of York; Robert de Seizevaux, Clerk.

1301, we don't know if this is this Nicholas or his son:
Grimstone and Eslington (Heslington?), Yorkshire:
http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=49741&strquery=langeton

29 August 1302
York city, Coney Street (ii) (Ref: D/Sa/D 1540-1547)Ref: D/Sa/D 1540
John, son of Peter le Appelby, to Nicholas de Langeton and Margaret, the grantor's sister
Quitclaim of right in messuage in Conyngstrete
(1 parchment, seal)
http://www.durhamrecordoffice.org.uk/Pages/AdvancedSearchCatalogueDetail.aspx?SearchType=Param&SearchID=12804a71-ae76-4d6c-aca2-0edf53bc76f0&ItemID=169904

1302/3
Yorkshire
WEST LUTTON
...Nicholaus de Langeton xij. bov., ...
https://archive.org/stream/inquisitionsasse06grea-1

1310:
http://www.eastriding.gov.uk/CalmView/Record.aspx?src=CalmView.Catalog&id=zDDCC%2f135%2f4&pos=1

1316
Yorkshire
HEWORTHE - Nicholas de Langeton
https://archive.org/stream/inquisitionsasse06greapage/n226/mode/2up

in Naburn (E.R.), Swinefleet (W.R.), Over Dinsdale (N.R.), and Reedness (W.R.). (fn. 44) His son, John Langton,was likewise a substantial property owner in town and country, and a military tenant ofthe Archbishop of York in Huddleston (W.R.).

http://www.archive.org/stream/cu31924084250616/cu31924084250616_djvu.txt

This Nicholas?
http://www.archive.org/stream/recordseries17yorkuoftage/6/mode/2up/search/langetone

http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=36336&strquery=langton%20OR%20langtun%20OR%20langeton%20OR%20lankton%20OR%20lancton
 Married/ Related to:
1081345 (540672)
1081348 (540674)
man John "John Melsa" de Meaux of Leppington, Yorkshire, uk‏‎ #49355
Born ‎before 1225, died ‎after 1298‎, at least 73 years
The Manor of Huddleston passed by the marriage of Beatrix, the heiress, great granddaughter of Sir Richard, to John de Melsa (18th Edw. I, 1290.) Note that they would likely married earlier than this date though.

John did homage to Archbishop.c.1298 for land in Huddleston, Garthorpe, Youlthorpe, the later east of York.

22 Sept. 1269 and 16 Feb. 1270/71 and 7 July 1277 and 1278-9 - witness: http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/A2A/records.aspx?cat=157-ddfj_1-2&cid=-11
 Married ‎± 1255 a guess based on other events (approximately 32 years married) to:
1081349 (540674)
woman Beatrix Huddleston‏‎ #49356
Born ‎± 1230 a guess based on other events., died ‎± 1287‎, approximately 57 years
heiress of the manor of Huddleston in the West Riding.
generation XXII (19th Great-Grandparents)

2162690 (1081345)
 Married/ Related to:
2162691 (1081345)
2162696 (1081348)
man Godfrey "Godfrey Melsa" de Meaux‏‎ #49357
Born ‎± 1200 a guess based on other events.
 Married/ Related to:
2162697 (1081348)
N.N.‎
2162698 (1081349)
man Richard Huddleston‏‎ #49358
Born ‎before 1199, died ‎after 1223‎, at least 24 years
1223 - held:
Garthorpe, Yorkshire
In 1262 Sir Richard Huddleston obtained a license from the Dean of York to hear divine service in his private chapel in the court of Huddleston.
 Married/ Related to:
2162699 (1081349)
generation XXIII (20th Great-Grandparents)

4325380 (2162690)
 Married/ Related to:
4325381 (2162690)
N.N.‎
4325392 (2162696)
man John de Meaux‏‎ #49368
Born ‎before 1150, died ‎before 1182‎
 Married/ Related to:
4325393 (2162696)
N.N.‎
4325396 (2162698)
man Richard Huddleston of Huddleston, Yorkshire, UK‏‎ #49367
Born ‎before 1175, died ‎after 1175‎, at least 1 years
1175 - held:
Clementhorpe, York.
Hillam
Wetwang
Poppleton
 Married/ Related to:
4325397 (2162698)
N.N.‎
4325398 (2162699)
 Married/ Related to:
4325399 (2162699)
N.N.‎
generation XXIV (21th Great-Grandparents)

8650796 (4325398)
 Married/ Related to:
8650797 (4325398)
N.N.‎